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In Florida, there are many things that are certain. There are always hot days, there is traffic on the Interstate, and there is a looming fear of how climate change will affect the way of life. In Miami, there is a surge in urgency for dealing with the rising concerns of climate change. One of them is the danger of the 8,500-mile Floridian coastline that will inevitably erode over the next two decades. That includes most of South Florida and all  the Keys. This undoubtedly makes Miami the most vulnerable coastal city in the United States, and quite possibly the world. It is projected that there will be an elevation of 8 to 12 inches in water levels between the two most densely populated counties in Florida. The first being in Miami, (Miami-Dade County), and the other in the Tampa Bay region.

The governor of Florida has taken steps to reduce the effects of climate change by implementing policies like stricter rules on emissions, as well as adding more incentives for utility companies to switch from coal to natural gas. That being said, it does not deter the impact that climate change has already had on the environment in Florida. It is stated that even if we were to cut out emissions entirely as of now, the foregoing effects of greenhouse gases will be felt for years to come. However, the state is still taking measures to be better prepared for a future that is hopefully less harsh than what has been estimated.

 

References:

 

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/miami-is-the-most-vulnerable-coastal-city‚Äč worldwide/

 

 

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2 Responses

  1. Global warming causes several different adverse impacts, among them sea-level rise, which is one of the most dangerous impacts of climate change. The increasing sea-levels could destroy many coastal cities and islands around the globe, like major coastal cities in Florida, or the atoll nations: Kiribati, Tuvalu, the Maldives, and the Marshall Islands which are at the greatest risk. It may be that in just a decade or two, some cities will be dramatically altered and islands would disappear because of the rising sea-level.

  2. The acceleration in sea level rise is due mostly by human-caused global warming. Sea level rise, particularly in coastal cities and islands, can cause economic hardship caused by a temporary decline in tourism and real estate sales. Also, rebuilding costs and harmed agriculture lands due to flooding, can cause food shortages and lead to price increases among other negative economic impacts. There have been those suffering extreme psychological damage when faced with the loss of a home, a lost or injured family member from floods and storms. A study reveals that a long term projection, each Celsius degree rise, can raise the sea 2 or 3 meters.

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