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Learning to Design Buildings for Climate Change by CityTech Blogger Yocelyne Portillo

As a student majoring in Architectural Technology, climate change can influence and relate to my academic major in many ways. Architecture not only focuses on creating a well functioning and aesthetically pleasing building design, but it also must be safe and economical. It is important to design and construct energy-efficient buildings that could help reduce the climate change the Earth faces. There are some architectural courses that focus on sustainability in architecture as well as teaches students to understand climate change. Courses such as Building Performance Workshop introduce students to being innovative with building materials and systems that can lessen the impact of climate changes on our planet. In other courses like site planning students learn the importance of site development as related to architecture and the importance of sustainable site development.

https://interdisciplinaryfuturedesign.wordpress.com/2014/10/23/green-environmental-buildings-to-control-climate-change-for-the-future/

The architectural designs we produce in any design class does not only focus on incorporating the program requirements in mind but also an analysis of the site and how it may be affected by it. Victor Olygyay, a principal architect of the Rocky Mountain institute, said, “Architects must lead in building the solutions to climate change. By making good energy and environmental design part of standard practice, we send a positive signal that market forces are stronger than ever in recognizing and capturing the opportunities around climate-responsible practices. “If we design better and more efficient buildings we can help lessen climate change and its impacts on us.

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  1. I’m an Urban Studies major with a concentration in Environmental Science and Sustainable development so I am very interested in architectural designs aimed at creating environmentally friendly buildings and offsetting the negative environmental consequences created by urban construction. The picture embedded in your post perfectly exemplifies the ability for buildings to reduce their albedo by adding vegetation to the roof while also serving as an urban green space- absorbing pollutants! Also, ‘green’ designs do not necessarily have to literally be green or have vegetation- changing window designs can reduce the amount of lighting or temperature adjustment necessary for operating the building.

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