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Waters Run Deep by CityTech Blogger Krystal Valdez

According to a recent study done by students and professors at Portland State University, Department of Geology, it has been discovered that one of the largest glaciers in America located at Wind River Range Wyoming are melting. Roughly around 70 years ago researchers first measured one of the glaziers called Dinwoody, and they calculated the area to be about 850 acres of snow. Fifty years later researchers returned to measure Dinwoody once again and discovered only about 540 acres of snow left in the mountains. Residents of Wyoming depend greatly on these glaciers for their water supply, especially for their cattle and for industrial purposes such as water to run power plants. Many state officials have started planning for surviving droughts. Fortunately, enough local residents are near the Green River which also supplies water for their everyday use and can be used as a backup plan for water needed if snowmelt slows in its production of water.

https://snowbrains.com/nasa-glacier-national-park-could-lose-all-its-glaciers-by-2030/

We as a nation keep hearing news on global warming and we know of simple acts we can do to help our mother earth against global warming. But we chose to ignore the signs. It never really hits us how drastic these situations actually are until we are being affected by them.  And by the time we all chose to react, it may be too late to turn back around. Just because we don’t live near these places such as Wind River Range in Wyoming, does not mean that global warming won’t affect us in our cities. It’s just like my mother says, waters run deep, and in this case, they can run deep enough to drown us out if glaciers such as these keep melting in Wyoming and especially in Antarctica.

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One Response

  1. I am recently doing some research on climate change and found out that there was a dramatic drought in Syria which brought many challenges to people’s lives. The food prices had significantly doubled from the original ones and there was a lack of water in fertile land to raise crops. This pushed farmers to move toward to the large cities. Therefore, if we burn less fossil fuels and makes less pollution in the air which can release carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, then we will live happily in this lovely planet.

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