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Students for a Sustainable Stanford hold panel on agriculture and climate change

Last week the Stanford Daily, the newspaper for Stanford University in California, a story by staff writer Zachary Birnholz reported on the Students for a Sustainable Stanford (SSS) and the Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. A panel discussion entitled “Crops and Carbon: Agriculture and Climate Change Demystified,” was sponsored by the Climate and Energy subgroup of SSS and focused on the relationship between agriculture and climate change. The SSS has long focused on demystifying various issues associated with climate change.

SSS is a coalition of students working for to promote sustainability improvements at Stanford University. Their projects include holding regular events, campaigns such as implementing a water inefficiency Iphone App, collaboration with Solar and Wind Energy Project (SWEP) to install photovoltaic panels around campus, a public waste audit, among others.

 

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