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Keystone Pipeline, worth the risk?

The ExxonMobil spill in Arkansas on Friday March 29th has been spewing black sludge called dilbit in to unsuspecting residents yards and roadways. Dilbit, which comes from tar sands AND is exactly what would be flowing through the Keystone XL pipeline, isn’t technically oil and therefore is not covered by the Oil Spill Liability Fund that oil companies must pay in to. This loophole in policy and the seeming inability of oil companies to prevent these spills are giving opponents of the Keystone Pipeline new ground to stand on.  Where do you stand?

Amy Fine

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