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China ‘won’t follow US’ on carbon emissions

The BBC reports that China has pledged not allow its per-capita CO2 emissions to reach US levels. A recent study by the European Commission’s Joint Research (JRC) has found that US per-capita emissions are between 2.5-3 times larger than China’s, but it claims that if China’s continue to rise at its present rate, they could arrive at US levels as early as 2017. As evidence of the magnitude at which China’s emissions are rising, the JRC noted that China’s emissions per person have tripled since 1990. Much of this rise can be attributed to heavy industrialization fueled by coal-based energy. When asked if China may commit to reducing its emissions in the near future, Xie Zhenhua, vice chair of the National Development and Reform Commission, said “China will make commitments that are appropriate for its development”. Still, China expects to increase its energy efficiency by at least 40% in the coming decade. Many are hopeful that any measures to mitigate climate change taken in prominent developing powers like China, will serve to encourage others to follow suit.

Ricky Ghoshroy

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